Categories
Freedom of expression Human rights, identity and citizenship Social inclusion and fight against discriminations Socio-economic issues and migrations

LEAVING NO ONE BEHIND Towards Inclusive Citizenship in Arab Countries

PDF) Leaving No One Behind Towards Inclusive Citizenship in Arab Countries Arab  Human Development Report Research Paper

Arab Human Development Report

LEAVING NO ONE BEHIND
Towards Inclusive Citizenship in Arab Countries

Research Paper published for the United Nations Development Programme – Regional Bureau for Arab States

Authors: Adel Abdellatif, Paola Pagliani and Ellen Hsu

Introduction
Building inclusive societies has been a challenge in Arab countries, and the limitations in inclusion have become more acute since 2011, as the relationship between citizens and the state — and among various social
groups — has deteriorated in some countries.
Despite different governance structures, all Arab countries manifest serious fault lines in modern notions of citizenship.
The starting point of this paper is that the Arab region’s human development fault lines have grown more complex since 2011 — and deepened in several countries. Today many people live insecure lives, more people live under persistent pressures that inhibit them from realizing their potential as human beings, and too many lives are cut short as armed conflicts take their grim toll. If the ongoing conflicts are not resolved and demographic projections of faster population growth in crisis countries are realized, 40 percent of the people in Arab countries will live in crisis and conflict in 2030, when the SDGs should be achieved.
Achieving the SDGs in Arab countries thus requires addressing the most debilitating development problems related to citizenship in a region where the relations between the state and society remain deeply fraught and
contested amid political, social and economic fragility.
Given the importance of understanding, and potentially explaining, manifestations of exclusion and inequality, the link between citizenship and human development needs to be further explored.

Document: arab-hdr.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/UNDP_Citizenship_and_SDGs_report_web.pdf

Source: www.hdr.undp.org/en

Categories
Europe and the Mediterranean Focus Social inclusion and fight against discriminations Socio-economic issues and migrations Uncategorized

Thirty years of EU-Mediterranean Policies (1989-2019): an assessment

Authors: Bichara Khader & Haizam Amirah-Fernández


Document www.realinstitutoelcano.org/wps/wcm/connect/f2a74e40-1be3-483c-a2bd-5ac712c5f657/WP8-2020-Khader-Amirah-Thirty-years-EU-Mediterranean-Policies-1989-2019-an-assessment.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CACHEID=f2a74e40-1be3-483c-a2bd-5ac712c5f657

Web site:

Real Istituto Elcano www.realinstitutoelcano.org/wps/portal/rielcano_es/!ut/p/a1/04_Sj9CPykssy0xPLMnMz0vMAfGjzOKNQ1zcA73dDQ0MLIOcDRzdLbxDLE0NDcI8TIAKIoEKDHAARwNC-gtyQxUB1ntQFg!!/dl5/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh/

Categories
Focus Socio-economic issues and migrations

The EU’S Migration, Asylum and Mobility Policies in the Mediterranean

This MEDRESET Policy Brief summarizes the findings of MEDRESET’s WP7 on migration, mobility and asylum in the Mediterranean and identifies policy implications.

Migration, asylum and mobility represent an increasingly contentious field of governance in EuroMediterranean relations. In the Mediterranean area, cooperation in this policy field has long been characterized by fundamental divergences of interests and approaches, not only between the northern and southern shores of the Mediterranean, or between (predominantly) sending, transit and receiving countries, but also among institutional and civil society actors on both sides of the Mediterranean. (…)

By adopting a non-Eurocentric approach, and based on extensive empirical research, WP7 found that the EU’s discourse in the migration policy field is informed by two dominant frames – unilateralism and securitization – which translate into largely Eurocentric, securitizing and conditionality-based policies and practices. Moreover, WP7 found that, despite the existence of country-specific issues and different migration policy agendas in the Maghreb and the Middle East, SEM (South-Eastern Mediterranean) stakeholders in the four target countries (Lebanon, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey) share a common perception of EU migration policies as abusively and inappropriately restrictive and ineffective, elaborated in a unilateral way and imposed through unbalanced power relations.

With a high level of consensus among themselves, they recommend that the EU radically change its approach to Euro-Mediterranean relations and to migration governance in particular, in order to make it less Eurocentric and security-oriented, and more inclusive, balanced and responsive.
This policy brief describes, firstly, how stakeholders perceive the Mediterranean space and EU practices in it, and, secondly, which alternative policies they recommend.

Documento www.iai.it/sites/default/files/medreset_pb_5.pdf

In arabo www.iai.it/sites/default/files/medreset_pb_5_ar.pdf

Cordiscordis.europa.eu/project/id/693055/it

Categories
Socio-economic issues and migrations

Understanding Migration Journeys from Migrants’ Perspectives

WORLD MIGRATION REPORT 2018: CHAPTER 7

Authors: Marie Mcauliffe, Adrian Kitimbo, Alexandra M Goossens, Akm Ahsan Ullah

Introduction

The chapter discusses migration journeys and how migrants consider migration before and during such travel, acknowledging that there is a great diversity of experiences, but that nevertheless, some important aspects can be drawn from current migration research and practice. The next section provides a brief examination of migrants’ “self-agency” (i.e. migrants’abilities to make and act upon independent decisions and choices) and the “continuum of agency” that explains variations in choice when it comes to migrating. Section three then discusses key and emerging issues in migration research that are signalling shifts in how contemplations of migration and migration journeys have been changing for migrants themselves in recent years: (mis)information; preference for visas; risk and reward; and pressures to migrate. In the following section, we summarize some of the recent advances in research methods and technology that are making migrant-centric research more feasible globally.

The conclusion then discusses implications for research and policy initiatives, including those related to the global compact on migration. Overall, we argue that better understandings of migrants’ choices about migration and migration journeys are of fundamental importance to more effective policymaking on migration.

Document publications.iom.int/system/files/pdf/wmr_2018_en_chapter7.pdf

Sito Web worldmigrationreport.iom.int

Categories
Focus Socio-economic issues and migrations

MIGRATION AND MIGRANTS: REGIONAL DIMENSIONS AND DEVELOPMENTS

Chapter 3 MIGRATION AND MIGRANTS: REGIONAL DIMENSIONS AND DEVELOPMENTS (WORLD MIGRATION REPORT 2018

Introduction

This chapter seeks to assist migration policymakers, practitioners and researchers in making better sense of international migration by using a geographic perspective to present regional migration overviews. The analysis in this chapter focuses on six world regions as defined by the United Nations, and used by UN DESA and other organizations: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Northern America, Oceania.
For each of these regions, the analysis includes: (i) an overview and brief discussion of key migration statistics based on data compiled and reported by UN DESA and UNHCR; and (ii) succinct descriptions of “key features
and developments” in migration in the region, based on a wide range of data, information and analyses from international organizations, researchers and analysts. To account for the diversity of migration patterns, trends and issues within each of the six regions, the descriptive narratives of “key features and recent developments” are presented at the subregional level. For Africa, for example, this cascade approach allows for the presentationof insights from statistical data on Africa as a whole, followed by summary information on subregions including North Africa, West and Central Africa, and Eastern and Southern Africa. A breakdown of the regions and subregions is provided in appendix A. These subregional overviews provide information on migration patterns from, within and to the subregions.

Beyond this, attention has been paid to particular features that exist in
a subregion, such as labour migration and remittances, irregular migration, migrant smuggling, displacement (internal and international), and integration. The subregional overviews are not intended to be exhaustive, but are designed to be illustrative of key trends, patterns and issues.

Documento

publications.iom.int/system/files/pdf/wmr_2018_en_chapter3.pdf

Report www.iom.int/world-migration-report-2018

Sito Web worldmigrationreport.iom.int

Categories
Focus Socio-economic issues and migrations

WORLD MIGRATION REPORT 2018

REPORT OVERVIEW: MAKING SENSE OF MIGRATION
IN AN INCREASINGLY INTERCONNECTED WORLD

Authors: Marie McAuliffe, Head, Migration Research Division, IOM and Martin Ruhs, Associate Professor of Political Economy at the University
of Oxford.

Document publications.iom.int/system/files/pdf/wmr_2018_en_chapter1.pdf

Categories
Focus Socio-economic issues and migrations

World Migration Report 2020

Since 2000, IOM has been producing world migration reports. The World Migration Report 2020, the tenth in the world migration report series, has been produced to contribute to increased understanding of migration throughout the world. This new edition presents key data and information on migration as well as thematic chapters on highly topical migration issues.

Documento 

https://publications.iom.int/system/files/pdf/wmr_2020.pdf

Sito web https://worldmigrationreport.iom.int/wmr-2020-interactive/

Categories
Environment and climate change Europe and the Mediterranean Focus Gender equality Immigration Socio-economic issues and migrations Youth and the Mediterranean

Young people in the Mediterranean

Numerous of scientific publications on the subject and a large statistical data base.

POWER2YOUTH aimed at offering a comprehensive multi-level, interdisciplinary and gender-sensitive approach to the understanding of youth in the SEM (South-Eastern Mediterranean) region with a cross-national comparative design (case studies of Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon, Occupied Palestinian Territories, and Turkey). In particular, it explored the root causes of youth exclusion at three different levels of analysis (macro, meso and micro), while also investigating the role of youth collective and individual agency in challenging different forms of power. 

Website POWER2YOUTH. A Comprehensive Approach to the Understanding of Youth Exclusion and the Prospects for Youth-led Change in the South and East Mediterranean

Categories
Europe and the Mediterranean Freedom of expression Immigration Social inclusion and fight against discriminations Socio-economic issues and migrations

Mobility Policies in the Mediterranean

Title: The EU’S Migration, Asylum and Mobility Policies in the Mediterranean

This MEDRESET Policy Brief summarizes the findings of MEDRESET’s WP7 on migration, mobility and asylum in the Mediterranean and identifies policy implications.

Introduction

Migration, asylum and mobility represent an increasingly contentious field of governance in Euro-Mediterranean relations. In the Mediterranean area, cooperation in this policy field has long been characterized by fundamental divergences of interests and approaches, not only between the northern and southern shores of the Mediterranean, or between (predominantly) sending, transit and receiving countries, but also among institutional and civil society actors on both sides of the Mediterranean.

MEDRESET Work Package 7 (WP7) was aimed: firstly, at developing a deeper knowledge of the diverse perceptions and priorities of different stakeholders with regard to migration; secondly, at evaluating the EU’s policies and role in the field of migration, mobility and asylum in the southern and eastern Mediterranean (SEM) region from the viewpoint of grassroots actors, at both the local and the EU level; and thirdly, at formulating a set of policy recommendations that reflect the perspective of civil societystakeholders, especially from SEM countries, with the purpose of innovating the governance of migration in the Mediterranean.

By adopting a non-Eurocentric approach, and based on extensive empirical research, WP7 found that the EU’s discourse in the migration policy field is informed by two dominant frames – unilateralism and securitization – which translate into largely Eurocentric, securitizing and conditionality-based policies and practices. Moreover, WP7 found that, despite the existence of country-specific issues and different migration policy agendas in the Maghreb and the Middle East, SEM stakeholders in the four target countries (Lebanon, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey) share a common perception of EU migration policies as abusively and inappropriately restrictive and ineffective, elaborated in a unilateral way and imposed through unbalanced power relations.

With a high level of consensus among themselves, they recommend that the EU radically change its approach to Euro-Mediterranean relations and to migration governance in particular, in order to make it less Eurocentric and security-oriented, and more inclusive, balanced and responsive.

This policy brief describes, firstly, how stakeholders perceive the Mediterranean space and EU practices in it, and, secondly, which alternative policies they recommend.

Document: www.iai.it/sites/default/files/medreset_pb_5.pdf

En arabe: www.iai.it/sites/default/files/medreset_pb_5_ar.pdf

Source: www.iai.it

Cordis: cordis.europa.eu/project/id/693055/it

Categories
Europe and the Mediterranean Focus Immigration Social inclusion and fight against discriminations Socio-economic issues and migrations Youth and the Mediterranean

Refugee Movements in the Middle East: Old Crises, New Ideas

Title: Refugee Movements in the Middle East: Old Crises, New Ideas

Auteur: Shaden Khallaf

The MENA region has been dealing with waves of refugee crises for decades. Addressing urban and protracted refugee crises in the region contributed to triggering reflection on the global governance of refugee protection. The Global Compact on Refugees now sets out the parameters for stronger solidarity and responsibility-sharing, based on multi-stakeholder partnerships, inclusive and comprehensive solutions, and stronger emphasis on host community support and engagement as the new way forward.

Document: https://www.iai.it/sites/default/files/menara_wp_29.pdf

Source: www.iai.it